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NIGHT SKY WEBCASTS: Perseid Meteor Shower Webcast by NASA

Night sky photographer Cody Limber assembled this amazing mosaic of the 2013 Perseid meteor shower during four nights of observing from his deck on Orcas Island in Washington. The bright, nearly full moon will interfere with the peak of the 2014 Perseid m
Night sky photographer Cody Limber assembled this amazing mosaic of the 2013 Perseid meteor shower during four nights of observing from his deck on Orcas Island in Washington. The bright, nearly full moon will interfere with the peak of the 2014 Perseid meteor shower.
CREDIT: Cody Limber

Update for Thursday, Aug. 13: NASA's webcast of the Perseid meteor shower peak has concluded. Space.com readers are sending in photos of the Perseids. You can see those amazing meteor photos here: Amazing Perseid Meteor Shower Photos of 2015


Broadcast live streaming video on Ustream

The Perseid meteor shower occurs every August when the Earth passes through a stream of dusty debris from Comet Swift-Tuttle, a comet that orbits the sun once every 133 years. The Perseids have been observed by humans for at least 2,000 years, according to NASA officials. The meteors are made up of ice and dust shed by Swift-Tuttle, most of which was cast off by the comet hundreds of years ago. 

Perseid Meteor Shower Sky Maps for 2015

The best time to observe the Perseids will be in the pre-dawn hours of Thursday, Aug. 13. "The Perseids streak across the sky from many directions, with theoretical rates as high as 100 per hour. The last time the Perseids peak coincided with a new moon was in 2007, making this one of the best potential viewings in years," NASA officials wrote in a statement.

From NASA: 

"Special guests on the live NASA TV broadcast include meteor experts Bill Cooke, Danielle Moser and Rhiannon Blaauw, all of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office, located at Marshall. They will provide on-air commentary, as well as answer questions online. Also scheduled to join the broadcast are experts from NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, the American Meteor Society and others."

Editor's note: If you snap a great photo of the Perseid meteor shower and want to share it for a possible story or gallery, send images and comments in to managing editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com.

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